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Our weekly round up of good stuff for physical therapists to share on social media. Share it, post it, and get involved in the talk. Our conversation starters this week:
5 converation starters for PTs this week.

Total Joint Replacement: Statistics for Post Surgery and Rehabilitation

From www.medbridgeeducation.com
There are 500,000 knee replacements performed every year in the United States–and that number is on the rise. But are all of these surgeries necessary–and are there alternatives? Furthermore, are TKA patients getting the maximum benefits from surgery?
A recent article on Medbridge.com examines pain and function post surgery compared to non-TKA individuals, and the statistics are great ammo for physical therapists:

  • One year after post-op, TKA patients walk 18% slower, climb stairs 51% slower, and have quadriceps deficits of nearly 40% compared to their age-matched non-TKA counterparts.
  • Approximately 75% of TKA patients report difficulty negotiating stairs.
  • 24% of total knee patients fall in the first year.
  • Only 26% of TKA patients are referred to outpatient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty.

If knees are your thing, there’s plenty of fodder here worthy of sharing with patients and providers alike.

The Right Way to Stretch Before Exercise

from nytimes.com
Is old school, static stretching dead? Not so fast, says a new study in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism. Take an opportunity to debunk stretching myths and suggest different stretches for different types of athletes.

To Prevent Back Pain, Orthotics Are Out, Exercise Is In

From nytimes.com
And who better to guide you through pain-reducing exercise than a physical therapist?

C.T.E. Is Found in an Ex-Giant Tyler Sash, Who Died at 27

from nytimes.com
If you’re a football fan, it can be hard to reconcile the love you have for the sport with stories like this. Just today, reports have been published showing that ex-Giant safety Tyler Sash suffered from C.T.E., or chronic traumatic encephalopathy–a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated trauma that has been found in dozens of former N.F.L. players.
Superbowl time is a great time to come together to watch America’s biggest game, but there’s no running from concussions anymore–and it’s something you should talk about. Advocating for awareness is a no-brainer for physical therapists who happen to be football fans, too.